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Outstanding Service to TASA Award

This honour is accorded to a TASA member who has demonstrated an outstanding level of participation in and promotion of TASA over a number of years. There are many ways in which this can occur, but in all cases the quality of the service is the determining criterion, rather than the quantity alone. Process No […]

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The literature on retirement and ageing and its historical perspective

TASA member Alan Scott shares below a paper he wrote about retirement and ageing: Introduction This paper identifies the increasing scope and complexity of the literature on retirement and ageing and provides a review of the historical literature that identifies and offers an understanding of ageing and retirement. The literature on retirement and ageing Gilleard […]

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TASA Award for Distinguished Service to Australian Sociology

This award is made to a TASA member who has demonstrated outstanding, significant and sustained service to Australian sociology over many years. While not necessarily a lifetime achievement award, candidates for the Distinguished Service Award would usually be nearing the end of their careers. In this context, outstanding service may take the form of one […]

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Dominant Theories

TASA member Alan Scott, is the Continuing Education Officer for the Applied Sociology thematic group. Each month, Alan writes about a topic that has caught his eye. This month’s topic is on dominant theories. The November 2016 issue of Contemporary Sociology (American Sociological Association), has a review by Michael Strand of a book with the title […]

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TASA Sociology in Action Award

This award recognizes contributions to the practice of sociology outside of academic settings. It is conferred on a TASA member who has made an outstanding contribution to sociological practice in Australia. In this context, outstanding contributions to sociology in action highlight the value and impact of sociological methods and theories to society. This includes both […]

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TASA Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teaching in Australian Sociology

This award, first offered in 2015, celebrates outstanding contributions to enhancing the pedagogy, practice or outcomes of teaching and learning sociology in Australia. It recognises contributions at the disciplinary level (rather than acknowledging excellence in teaching within the classroom or institutions). Examples of disciplinary-level contributions include innovations in teaching that increase the impact of sociology […]

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PewDiePie, new media stars and the court of public opinion

TASA member Marcus Maloney discusses new media stars and public perception of youth online discourse on 2ser 107.3. Click here to listen to the podcast. The radio interview stemmed from an article written by Marcus & his colleague, Steven Roberts, shown below: Steven Roberts, Monash University and Marcus Maloney, Monash University PewDiePie is the username of […]

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February wrap up: Books by TASA members

Hendry, N. A. (2017). Social media bodies: Revealing the entanglement of sexual wellbeing, mental health and social media in education. In L. Allen & M. L. Rasmussen (Eds.), Palgrave handbook of sex education (pp. 509–526). London: Palgrave Macmillan.         Voola, A. P., Beavis, K. & Mundkur, A. (2017). A “Fair Go” in the […]

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Jean Martin Award: nominations close April 1

The Jean Martin Award recognises excellence in scholarship in the field of Sociology and aims to assist with establishing the career of a recent PhD graduate. This Award, which was given for the first time in 1980, is granted to the best PhD thesis in social science disciplines from an Australian tertiary institution submitted to […]

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February wrap up: Informed News & Analysis by TASA members

Andrew Jakubowicz, et al.: Australians believe 18C protections should stay, The Conversation  Marcus Maloney & Steve Roberts: PewDiePie, new media stars and the court of public opinion, The Conversation  David Rowe: Prize fight over live-streamed sport will go on long after the final bell sounds,The Conversation Karen Fisher: Shared ownership can help make housing affordable for people with disability, The Conversation Karen Willis & Sophie Lewis: Increased […]

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February wrap up: Journal articles by TASA members

Strengers, Y. Nicholls, L. (published online 21/2/17), ‘Convenience and energy consumption in the smart home of the future: industry visions from Australia and beyond.’ Energy Research and Social Science. Strengers, Y. Maller, C. (published online 16/2/17), ‘Adapting to ‘extreme’ weather: mobile practice memories of keeping warm and cool as a climate change adaptation strategy’, Environment and Planning A.  Kim Jose, Alison […]

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February wrap up: Podcasts by TASA members

Marcus Maloney: Fame in the Internet Age- the case of PewDiePie, 2SER – Real Radio 107.3 FM Xiaoying Qi discusses her paper  Social Movements in China: Augmenting Mainstream Theory with Guanxi. Click here to listen to the podcast. Meredith Nash: Digital Discussion Series: Homeward Bound Expedition interview with Meredith Nash, United Nations Academic Impact Tom Barnes: Toyota to end car […]

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Book: Gay Men’s Working Lives, Retirement and Old Age

TASA member Peter Robinson, a Senior Lecturer in History and Sociology at Swinburne University, has completed the third book in his series on Gay Men. Peter Robinson’s first book, The Changing World of Gay Men was published in 2008 (Palgrave Macmillan, UK) and won The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Inaugural Raewyn Connell Prize in 2010 for the […]

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January wrap up: Informed News Analysis & Commentary by TASA members

David Rowe: Australia needs to make sport a more equal playing field: here’s why, The Conversation Yolande Strengers, Cecily Maller, Larissa Nicholls: Hot dogs and cool cats: keeping pets cool without blowing your energy bill, The Conversation Mark Chou & Michael Ondaatje: The Drama of Politics: Enacting Trump’s Presidential Self, ABC Religion and Ethics Catherine Strong: One year on, we should remember […]

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Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Sociology of Ageing/Social Gerontology

Sociology Programme School of Humanities and Social Sciences Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Young and research-intensive, Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) is ranked 13th globally and 1st amongst the world’s best young universities. The School of Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS) at NTU offers undergraduate and graduate degree programmes in a full range of disciplines. Interdisciplinary […]

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January wrap up: Blog posts by TASA members

Joni Meenagh: Masculinity So Stale: Cultural Narratives of Men’s Sexual Refusals Fabian Cannizzo: The Deep Story: A Reflection on Arlie Hochschild’s Strangers in Their Own Land Ann Game: Master woodworker Alexia Maddox: Serendipity, crowdfunding and cryptocurrencies Deborah Lupton: 15 top tips for revising journal articles Ann Game: The Pharmacist in Anghiari Ann Game: Buongiorno Anne Game: The Talozzi family Ann Game: Sun and fire Deborah […]

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January wrap up: Journal Article Publications by TASA Members

Meredith Nash. (2017). ‘White pregnant bodies on the Australian beach: A visual discourse analysis of family photographs’.Journal of Gender Studies. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09589236.2016.1264297 R. Lloyd, M. Newlands and Theresa Petray (2017) Coral Battleground? Re-examining the ‘Save the Reef’ Campaign in 1960s Australia.Environmental Sociology 3(1): 54-63. Katie Wright. (2016). ‘Speaking out: Representations of child sexual abuse in media, memoir and public inquiries’. Red Feather […]

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December wrap up: Videos by TASA members

Dan Woodman & Bryan Turner: TASA 2016 Open Plenary Safer Schools for LGBTIQ People and their Families: A panel organised by the Families and Relationships Thematic Group (FRG) at TASA2016 to explore Safer Schools for LGBTIQ People and their families. The four presenters include: Jennifer Power – Rainbow Families in Schools; Lucy Nicholas –  Safe Schools Coalition and […]

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December wrap up: Podcasts by TASA members

Andrew Jakubowicz: Is the Australian working class racist? Only if prompted, says expert. Katies Hughes: TASA2016 Presidential address Doug Ezzy: Governing Religious Diversity in Australia Theresa Petray and Nick Pendergrast: Experimental Utopias and Social Change: Examples from Australian Non-Hegemonic Activism (Power Point slides – Experimental Utopias and Social Change: Examples from Australian Non-Hegemonic Activism) Nick Pendergrast: Rescuing Dogs in […]

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December wrap up: Books by TASA members

McKenzie, Lara 2017. ‘A precarious passion: Gendered and age-based insecurity among aspiring academics in Australia’, in Being an early career feminist academic: Global perspectives, experiences, and challenges, Thwaites, Rachel & Pressland, Amy (eds), Studies in gender and education series, Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 31-49. doi: 10.1057/978-1-137-54325-7       Bourdieusian Prospects (Routledge), edited by […]

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December wrap up: Informed News Analysis & Commentary by TASA members

Stewart Lockie: Why give the Green Army its marching orders? The Conversation Alexandra Gibson, Alex Broom & Zarnie Lwin: ‘It’s your fault you got cancer’: the blame game that doesn’t help anyone, The Conversation Maurizio Labbate, Alphia Possamai-Inesedy, Erica Donner & Roisin McMahon: Why the health and agriculture sectors need to work together to stop antibiotic resistance, The Conversation Petra Bueskens: Why We Grieved For Hillary […]

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December wrap up: Blog posts by TASA members

James Arvanitakis : Education Blog: Graduate Attributes for 2017 and beyond Megan Sharp: The Oakland Ghost Ship warehouse fire resonates with queers globally by Megan Sharpe Andrew Metcalfe: Arriving in Anghiari James Arvanitakis: Education Blog: How educators are failing and how we can respond Alan Scott: Star Dust Ann Game: A walk in the Sovara valley Ann Game: The piazza Ann Game: Christmas […]

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December wrap up: Journal Article Publications by TASA Members

Malatzky, Christina. 2016. “Abnormal mothers: Breastfeeding, governmentality and emotion amongst regional Australian women.”Gender Issues. doi: 10.1007/s12147-016-9179-0 Lewthwaite, B., K. Wilson, V. Wallace, S. McGinty and L. Swain (2016) ‘Challenging normative assumptions regarding disengaged youth: a phenomenological perspective’, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education. Myconos, G., J. Thomas, K. Wilson, K. te Riele and L. Swain (2016) ‘Educational Re-engagement as Social Inclusion: […]

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Social media bodies: Revealing the entanglement of sexual wellbeing, mental health and social media in education

TASA member Natalie Hendry has a new book chapter out: Hendry, N. A. (2017). Social media bodies: Revealing the entanglement of sexual wellbeing, mental health and social media in education. In L. Allen & M. L. Rasmussen (Eds.), Palgrave handbook of sex education (pp. 509–526). London: Palgrave Macmillan.   You can follow Natalie on Twitter: @projectnat  

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Increased private health insurance premiums don’t mean increased value

Karen Willis, Australian Catholic University and Sophie Lewis, University of Sydney A topic of discussion at many barbecues this summer will inevitably be private health insurance. Is it worth it? Do we need it? Every year it gets more expensive. The average 4.8% increase in premiums just announced will have more Australians raising these questions, […]

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Shared ownership can help make housing affordable for people with disability

Ilan Wiesel, University of Melbourne and Karen R Fisher, UNSW The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is expected to help more people with disability access the support services they need to live independently in the community. But the majority of NDIS participants have low incomes. So, without substantial financial assistance, they struggle to find affordable […]

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Middle Eastern migrants aren’t ‘piling on to the dole queue’

John van Kooy, University of Melbourne Claims that Middle Eastern migrants are “piling on to the dole queue” are misleading. The data actually shows that, after an initial period of relatively high unemployment, labour force participation and employment rates amongst migrant communities eventually reach parity with the rest of the population. Recently released labour force […]

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Digital Discussion Series: Homeward Bound Expedition interview with Meredith Nash

TASA member Meredith Nash is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Tasmania and researcher in the field of feminist sociology of the body, health sociology and human geography. Her research has informed the Australian government’s policy and health practice and has received international recognition through the global media, quotation, and award. To study […]

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Is democracy a form of government that works?

TASA member Alan Scott, is the Continuing Education Officer for the Applied Sociology thematic group. Each month, Alan writes about a topic that has caught his eye. This month’s topic is on democracy. Last week I wandered around the local market.  There I found a book by H.G. Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) […]

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The markers of everyday racism in Australia

Claire Smith, Flinders University; Jordan Ralph, Flinders University, and Kellie Pollard, Flinders University While Australians value equality, our multicultural nation contains markers of racial discrimination. Some are so innocuous we may not recognise them. Experiencing racism is part of the everyday lives of many Australians. What is it like to negotiate daily life in a […]

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Survey: Impact of the Soviet-Afghan war (1979-1989) on the first post-Soviet generation: a study into transmission of war-related trauma.

TASA member Anna Denejkina is currently conducting research (Approval number: UTS HREC REF NO. ETH16-0356) into transmission of combat-related trauma from parent to child, specifically looking at how the Soviet-Afghan war (1979-1989) impacted on the first post-Soviet generation. Anna’s research would be of interest to anyone with a Russian, Ukrainian, or Eastern European background.   The survey is specifically […]

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Dignity in a Consumer Society: Thinking with Bauman and Hochschild

This article was written by TASA member Fabian Cannizzo. It was originally published on his blog and republished here with full permission from Fabian.  Advanced democratic societies are in need of new models to understand the politics emerging under the labels of neo-conservatism, ethno-nationalism, the alt-right, and, occasionally, anti-politics. The ostensive failure of polls to predict […]

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Video: Picturing pregnancy

TASA member Meredith Nash from the University of Tasmania asked a question that no other sociologist had asked before: How would women document their experiences of pregnancy if they were given a camera? She gave pregnant Tasmanian women digital cameras and asked them to photograph whatever they felt best captured their lives and experiences. Two […]

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Video: Action Sports for a Better World

TASA member Holly Thorpe talks about ‘Action Sports for a Better World’ in the video below. The website www.actionsportsfordev.org relates specifically to this topic, and provides access to recent research on the topic as well.

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Australia needs to make sport a more equal playing field: here’s why

David Rowe, Western Sydney University For an ostensibly fun-based activity, sport in Australia generates a good deal of anxiety. Questions like the following are often raised: Do enough people participate in it? Are they representative of the whole population? Is enough public and private funding given to the appropriate sports to enable success, especially in […]

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Employment Opportunity: Part time researcher

Part time contract researcher:  Research and Policy Centre, at the Brotherhood of St Laurence .8EFT for 3 months to work on a funded project on mature age jobseekers and employment services.  The focus of this role will be on employers: their recruitment practices and attitudes to employment services and mature age jobseekers.  Tasks include literature […]

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Masculinity So Stale: Cultural Narratives of Men’s Sexual Refusals

This post was originally published on the Genders and Sexualities Thematic Group website. Written by TASA member Joni Meenagh: At the recently concluded TASA conference I presented a paper titled ‘Masculinity So Stale: Negotiating Sexual Refusals in Heterosexual Relationships’ (link to slides). This paper explored a rarely talked about phenomenon: heterosexual men saying no to sex […]

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Hot dogs and cool cats: keeping pets cool without blowing your energy bill

Yolande Strengers, RMIT University; Cecily Maller, RMIT University, and Larissa Nicholls, RMIT University As the weather heats up, Australian households won’t just be cranking up the air conditioning for themselves. Some households will be turning it on for their dogs or cats. Our research on energy demand and household cooling highlights a recent trend towards […]

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Tracking global inequality trends

The World Wealth and Income Database (WID.world) has launched a new website and database to track global inequality trends. WID.world allows the general public, the media, researchers, social, business and political communities to follow the evolution of income and wealth inequality in their own country and throughout the world on interactive online tools. The full […]

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Deborah Lupton’s 15 top tips for revising journal articles

TASA member Deborah Lupton is a Centenary Research Professor associated with the News & Media Research Centre in the Faculty of Arts & Design at Canberra University. Her research and teaching is multidisciplinary, incorporating sociology, media and communication and cultural studies. Below is a list of Deborah’s top tips for revising journal articles, which were originally […]

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Free Access to all of Sage’s journals

The new SAGE Journals platform is now live. To celebrate the new platform and ensure they provide uninterrupted access to all users, Sage journals, in all disciplines, can be accessed free until the end of January.

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TASA WORKING DOCUMENT: RESPONSES TO CONTINGENT LABOUR IN ACADEMIA

The following document was put together by a team of TASA members. Namely, Kristin Natalier, Erika Altman, Mark Bahnisch, Tom Barnes, Suzanne Egan, Christine Malatzky, Christian Mauri & Dan Woodman Introduction and aims of the document In December 2015, the TASA Executive approved the establishment of a Working Group to identify the key challenges facing contingent […]

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Podcast: What Makes For a Successful, Liveable City?

What makes a successful city? What makes them liveable? These days, most of us live in cities but how can we make them better? Michael Pavlich is joined by TASA president Dan Woodman, Senior Lecturer for Sociology at the University of Melbourne, to discuss infrastructure, road traffic, public transport, rising real estate prices and other […]

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Deborah Lupton’s 2016 publications

TASA member Deborah Lupton is a Centenary Research Professor associated with the News & Media Research Centre in the Faculty of Arts & Design at Canberra University. Her research and teaching is multidisciplinary, incorporating sociology, media and communication and cultural studies. Below is a list of Deborah’s 2016 publications originally listed on her blog here.   […]

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November wrap up: Books by TASA members

Cox, J.L. & Possamai, A. (Eds.), Religion and Non-Religion among Australian Aboriginal Peoples, Routledge.               Germov, J. and Williams, L. (eds) 2017, A Sociology of Food and Nutrition: The Social Appetite, 4th edn, Melbourne: Oxford University Press.                 McHugh, T. (2013). Faces Inside and Outside the Clinic: […]

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November wrap up: Informed News Analysis & Commentary by TASA members

Belinda Hewitt & colleagues: Removal of ‘double dipping’ from parental leave may impact mothers’ health, The Conversation.  Matthew Wade: Fertility Clinics Still a Battleground for Queer People, Star Observer Mark Chou & colleagues: President Trump will change the United States and the world, but just how remains to be seen, The Conversation Andrew Jakubowicz: European leaders taking cues from […]

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November wrap up: Blog posts by TASA members

Yarrow Andrew: The Pronoun Dilemma  Michèle Lamont  & colleagues: Reaffirming our core values post-election James Arvanitakis: Meaning and Anxiety: a reflection of Lee Hong’s work Andrew Glover: Recruiting research participants using Twitter, The Research Whisper Andrew Jakubowicz: A Bigots’ Frenzy:: how race, class and gender still matter in the Australian politics of Section 18C. Deborah Lupton: 3D printing technologies: social perspectives Andrew Jakubowicz: European leaders […]

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November wrap up: Journal Article Publications by TASA Members

The first general report from a three-country “Global Arenas of Knowledge” project – Connell, Raewyn, Fran Collyer, João Maia and Robert Morrell.  2016. Toward a global sociology of knowledge: post-colonial realities and intellectual practices. International Sociology, published online November 2016, DOI: 10.1177/0268580916676913. Robards, B., & Lincoln, S. (2016) ‘Making It “Facebook Official”: Reflecting on Romantic Relationships Through Sustained Facebook […]

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Several Academic Sociology Job Opportunities

        The University of Melbourne has a short term position (around four months, full time – negotiable) for an experienced researcher to work with us to write up findings from a media analysis focusing on representations of class in newsprint media. Please contact Deborah Warr at the University of Melbourne to discuss […]

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Star Dust

Written by Alan Scott, TASA member and Continuing Education Officer for the Applied Sociology Thematic Group Another year is drawing to a close.  A lot of things have happened that will be of interest to Sociologists and perhaps other people.  Our Annual Conference provided a lot of new information and the Applied Sociology Thematic Group gathered […]

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The gender pay gap is harming women’s health

Allison Milner, University of Melbourne; Anne Kavanagh, University of Melbourne, and Belinda Hewitt, University of Melbourne Despite the fact more women are employed than ever before, a gender pay gap is still a reality in Australia. Most recent figures show a pay difference of around 23%, with men earning on average A$26,853 more than women […]

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Why secure and affordable housing is an increasing worry for age pensioners

Alan Morris, University of Technology Sydney The average housing costs of older (65-plus) outright homeowners in lone-person households were A$38 a week in 2013-14, the Australian Bureau of Statistics calculated, compared to $103 for older social housing tenants and $232 for older private renters. Fortunately, over the last several decades almost all Australians who depend […]

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TASA 2016 Reflection

Sandy Hart, Mid North Coast NSW Australia Attending the TASA conference was an enjoyable learning and networking experience. I am a Social Worker and I have not had the opportunity to attend a TASA conference previously. A number of aspects stood out to me from the conference. This included a diverse range of people, universities […]

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Why give the Green Army its marching orders?

Stewart Lockie, James Cook University It’s a rare week when natural resource management policy penetrates the national news cycle not once, but twice. Nonetheless, last Thursday the federal government struck a deal with the Greens to increase funding to Landcare programs by A$100 million in exchange for their support on other matters. No one quite […]

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First the word, then the deed: how an ‘ethnocracy’ like Australia works

Andrew Jakubowicz, University of Technology Sydney Amid the post-truth barrage engulfing Australian politics, one claim that needs a dose of testing is Malcolm Turnbull’s statement that Australia is the world’s leading multicultural society. Anyone watching the reaction of ethnic communities to the triple whammy of the Section 18C “review”, the “Muslim terrorist grandchildren” accusations and […]

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Parental anxiety and Pisa: to lift academic standards, stop segregating kids

This article, written by TASA member Joel Winner, the winner of the 2016 Stephen Crook Memorial Prize and the 2016 Raewyn Connell Prize, was originally published in The Guardian. Read the original article. The latest PISA results confirm a long-term decline in Australia’s performance, along with a slight worsening of our already lower-than-average equity levels. Disparities […]

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Behind Singapore’s PISA rankings success – and why other countries may not want to join the race

TASA member Amanda Wise, Macquarie University Singapore has topped the global Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings in maths, science and reading, while countries including Australia, France and the UK sit in the bottom batch of OECD countries for achievement in these areas. So what is Singapore doing right, and do other countries want to […]

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Sociology Employment Opportunities

        The School of Social and Political Sciences, at The University of Melbourne,  is seeking a Level B Lecturer in Sociology through the Melbourne Early Career Academic Fellowship program (MECAF). The successful applicant will complete a structured development programme provided by the University within their workload allocation. This programme provides training, supervision and appropriate career […]

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Smash it up, burn it down: should Joe Corré set fire to punk history this weekend?

Catherine Strong, RMIT University In March this year, Joe Corré announced that on November 26 he would burn his collection of punk memorabilia. As the son of Malcolm McLaren (manager of the Sex Pistols) and renowned fashion designer Vivienne Westwood (whose clothes helped define the punk aesthetic), Corré’s collection is somewhat more impressive than that […]

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ARIA there yet? Causes galore and some poop talk at the music industry awards

Catherine Strong, RMIT University It was the 30th ARIA awards last night in Sydney, an anniversary that saw some reminiscing on past glories included throughout the show. The event was top and tailed by some dead-set Aussie legends (mate), with Barnsie (alongside Jessica Mauboy) starting the show, and none other than Farnsie himself finishing the […]

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#TASA2016 program now available!

The program for the 2016 Annual Conference of the Australian Sociological Association is now available here. Please note, the Concurrent Program was update November 15. For more information on the conference, please visit the conference sub-site.

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The Pronoun Dilemma

This post was originally published on the Genders and Sexualities Thematic Group website. It has been republished here with permission from the G&S Conveners. Dr Yarrow Andrew, Flinders University One of my dilemmas as an academic, and one who researches gender issues, is how to enact my beliefs and values as a researcher in my relationships […]

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Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Sociology of Ageing/Social Gerontology

Employment Opportunity Sociology Programme School of Humanities and Social Sciences Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Young and research-intensive, Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) is ranked 13th globally and 1st amongst the world’s best young universities. The School of Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS) at NTU offers undergraduate and graduate degree programmes in a full range of […]

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The Oxford Dictionary Word of the year post-truth: Adjective

Alan Scott, Continuing Education Officer for the Applied Sociology thematic group, writes: DEFINITION: Relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief: ‘in this era of post-truth politics, it’s easy to cherry-pick data and come to whatever conclusion you desire’ ‘some […]

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Reaffirming our core values post-election

Michèle Lamont –  American Sociological Association (ASA) President & an invited keynote speaker for our annual conference, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva – ASA President-elect, Ruth Milkman – ASA Past President & Nancy Kidd – ASA Executive Officer wrote to the ASA members recently: In light of the rash of racist and xenophobic activities on campuses across the nation, it seems important to us as leaders […]

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TASA 2016 Conference Proceedings

From 2015 onward conference papers have been accepted by graduate and honours students only.  The papers are reviewed and, if accepted, published in the Conference Proceedings.  Thanks to fellow member Roger Wilkinson, the 2016 Conference Proceedings are now available.

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European leaders taking cues from Australia on asylum seeker policies

Andrew Jakubowicz, University of Technology Sydney Across Europe anti immigration political leaders are turning to Australia for inspiration on how to reduce the number of people seeking asylum in their countries. Australia’s asylum seeker policies have attracted condemnation from human rights organisations and many countries around the world. But in speeches given at US President […]

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President Trump will change the United States and the world, but just how remains to be seen

Mark Chou, Australian Catholic University; Gorana Grgic, University of Sydney; Kumuda Simpson, La Trobe University; Peter Christoff, University of Melbourne, and Rodney Maddock, Monash University Leading Australian academics respond to Donald Trump’s victory, and look ahead to what kind of president he might be. Much unknown about Trump’s foreign policy, but expect instability Gorana Grgic, […]

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Removal of ‘double dipping’ from parental leave may impact mothers’ health

Belinda Hewitt, University of Melbourne; Anne Kavanagh, University of Melbourne; Lyndall Strazdins, Australian National University, and Zoe Aitken, University of Melbourne Australian government proposals to end so-called “double dipping” with paid parental leave may scale back health benefits for women who take time off work to care for their babies. The proposed changes to the […]

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Digital Sociology @ #TASA2016

Brady Robards, Digital Media Portfolio Leader Here is a list of all the excellent ‘digital sociology’ papers happening at #TASA2016, 29 November – 1 December. You can find the full program here. I pulled out papers that, from the title, appear to intersect with digital methods/digital media/internet research, and compiled them below. Please email brady.robards@utas.edu.au if […]

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Congratulations

Our congratulations are extended to fellow TASA member, and 2016 conference volunteer, Naama Carlin, who was recently conferred a PhD in sociology, no revisions required. Well done Naama. We also congratulate the fellow TASA members who successfully attained an Australian Research Council (ARC) grant last week. Those members and their projects are listed below. Whilst we don’t want to take […]

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Is Social Democracy in Crisis?

Mark Bahnisch On July 29, Eva Cox, David Hetherington and I spoke at a forum organised by the New South Wales Fabians on the crisis of social democracy. This post is an adaptation of my talk. The blurb for the event nicely encapsulated the questions at issue: The Global Financial Crisis was supposed to herald […]

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Recent Book Publications by TASA Members

Katie Hughes (2017) Encouraging Diversity in Higher Education: Supporting student success, Routledge.               Leah Williams Veazey: ‘Mothering in the Digital Diaspora” in Taking the Village Online: Mothers, Motherhood and Social Media (Demeter Press, 2016).               Cecily Maller (2016) Homemaking Practices of Provision and Maintenance: Implications for […]

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To stop domestic violence, we need to change perpetrators’ behaviour

Tony Fletcher, University of South Australia and Sarah Wendt, Flinders University Behaviour change programs for domestically violent men are designed to address abusive and violent behaviour. Unlike anger management programs, the focus is on changing the perpetrator’s desire to control his partner by targeting his attitudes and behaviours. The long-term effects are difficult to measure, […]

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Suspending welfare payments won’t help young people get jobs

David Farrugia, University of Newcastle The Australian government wants to suspend welfare payments to unemployed young people who fail to turn up for mandatory training sessions. The belief is that this will help to tackle persistently high levels of youth unemployment. The rate is around 12% nationally, and up to 28% in some communities. The […]

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TASA 2016 Scholarship Recipients

We are thrilled to announce that the following 6 members have each been awarded a TASA Postgraduate Conference Scholarship. The scholarship covers a complimentary conference registration as well as travel funding to assist the recipients to attend TASA 2016.  Katie Hughes will be presenting their certificates at the Postgraduate Day afternoon tea onMonday November 28.  Congratulations to: Cassie […]

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The Danger of Dominant Theories

Alan Scott, TASA member and the Continuing Education Officer for the Applied Sociology Thematic Group. Yesterday I went to see my doctor who told me that the latest thing in medicine is “Descripting” that is checking a patients scripts to see whether they are being over medicated.  I came home and read an article in […]

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October wrap up: Journal Article Publications by TASA Members

Petra Bueskens (2016). Matricentric Feminism Is a Gift to the World. Forward to A O’Reilly, Matricentric Feminism: Theory, Activism, and Practice. Bradford: Demeter Press. Mitchell Hobbs, Stephen Owen, and Livia Gerber (2016). Liquid love? Dating apps, sex, relationships and the digital transformation of intimacy, The Journal of Sociology, OnLine First Boese, M. and K. Macdonald (2016). “Restricted entitlements […]

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Where do survivors fit in Australian sex industry research?

Written by Meagan Tyler, RMIT As the recent post ‘Sex Work and Southern Theory’ highlights, although there is a growing body of sociological research on the sex industry in Australia, there is still a lot missing. Few could argue with the example given, that there is still little to mirror existing international research on men […]

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Why do parents take such different approaches to their kids’ education?

Rose Butler, UNSW Australia and Christina Ho, University of Technology Sydney While some children spend the school holidays studying in tutoring centres, enrolled in sports camps or other structured activities, others are left to do their own thing. So why is it that parents take such different approaches to education and how their children spend […]

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ARIAs still matter to artists, but what do they say about us?

Catherine Strong, RMIT University High-profile awards ceremonies are often only as interesting as the controversies they create. The 2016 ARIA Awards has started strongly in this area. Although the main ceremony is still a month away, the Fine Arts and Artisan Awards awarded on October 5 raised eyebrows when the Best Classical Album award was […]

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What would another review of child support achieve? We know the problems, and how to fix them

Kristin Natalier, Flinders University and Kay Cook, RMIT University The Australian National Audit Office recently listed child support program arrangements between the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) and the Department of Human Services as a priority issue. This comes as the One Nation party calls for a review of child support. While the ATO changes were […]

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