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New Books

This page was created on August 15th, 2011 and is reserved for TASA members to include details of their publications. At least one of the authors or editors (named on the cover) must be a member of TASA and the content needs to be about some aspect of Australian sociology (broadly defined), including textbooks. To keep the site up-to-date, books must have been published in the current year. Books will be displayed on this page for approximately 3 months, after which time brief details will be transferred to the Sociology Resource section of TASAweb where they will be displayed in chronological order.

To have your New Book listed on this page, please forward the book details, including a brief outline, picture of the cover and a link to the publisher’s website to admin@tasa.org.au.

Political Islam and Masculinity: Muslim Men in Australia

Roose, J. (2016) Political Islam and Masculinity: Muslim Men in Australia, Palgrave Macmillan.

This book reveals important and timely insights into why young Australian Muslim men, often from very similar social backgrounds, pursue such dramatically different political paths in the name of Islam. This has important implications for promoting cohesion and challenging the increasing popularity of the Islamic State movement in the West.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Youth Cultures, Transitions and Generations: Bridging the Gap in Youth Research

Bennett, Andy, Woodman, Dan (Eds.). (2015) Youth Cultures, Transitions and Generations: Bridging the Gap in Youth Research, Palgrave Macmillan.

Within contemporary youth research there are two dominant streams – a ‘transitions’ and a ‘cultures’ perspective. This collection shows that it is no longer possible to understand the experience of young people through these prisms and proposes new conceptual foundations for youth studies, capable of bridging the gap between these approaches.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

The War on Drugs in Sport: Moral Panics and Organisational Legitimacy

McDermott, V. 2016 The War on Drugs in Sport: Moral Panics and Organisational Legitimacy, Routledge, New York.

This book is an innovative and compelling work that develops a modified moral panic model illustrated by the drugs in sport debate. Drawing on Max Weber’s work on moral authority and legitimacy, McDermott argues that doping scandals create a crisis of legitimacy for sport governing bodies and other elite groups.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

The Good Citizen: Models of Citizenship for the 21st Century

Ingrid Matthews and James Arvanitakis (2016). ‘The Good Citizen: Models of Citizenship for the 21st Century’. In, Daniel Morse (Ed) Post-Civics: The Citizen in the 21st Century. Oxford UK: Interdisciplinary Press.

Post-Civics: The Citizen in the 21st Century engages with modern citizens in all of their complicated glory, examines what citizenship means to those living at the margins of society, and contemplates the role and character of the citizen in the 21st century.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Breastfeeding shame and the birth of the mother

Catherine Robinson (2015) ‘Breastfeeding shame and the birth of the mother’ in The Mother Blame Game (ed Vanessa Reimer and Sarah Sahagian)

The Mother-Blame Game is an interdisciplinary and intersectional examination of the phenomenon of mother-blame in the twenty-first century. As the socioeconomic and cultural expectations of what constitutes “good motherhood” grow continually narrow and exclusionary, mothers are demonized and stigmatized—perhaps now more than ever—for all that is perceived to go “wrong” in their children’s lives. This anthology brings together creative and scholarly contributions from feminist academics and activists alike to provide a dynamic study of the many varied ways in which mothers are blamed and shamed for their maternal practice. Importantly, it also considers how mothers resist these ideologies by engaging in empowered and feminist mothering practices, as well as by publicly challenging patriarchal discourses of “good motherhood.”

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

The Milk of Human Kinship: Donated Breast Milk in Neonatal Intensive Care

Carroll, K. (2016) ‘The Milk of Human Kinship: Donated Breast Milk in Neonatal Intensive Care’ in ‘Critical Kinship Studies’ Charlotte Kroløkke, Lene Myong, Stine Willum Adrian and Tine Tjørnhøj-Thomsen (Eds.) Roman and Littlefield International – Intersections. pp. 15-31

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Opening the Black Box: The Work of Watching

Smith, G.J.D. (2015) Opening the Black Box: The Work of Watching, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) cameras are a prominent, if increasingly familiar, feature of urbanism. They symbolize the faith that spatial authorities place in technical interventions for the treatment of social problems. CCTV was principally introduced to sterilize municipalities, to govern conducts and to protect properties. Vast expenditure has been committed to these technologies without a clear sense of how precisely they influence things. CCTV cameras might appear inanimate, but Opening the Black Box shows them to be vital mediums within relational circulations of supervision.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Compulsory Schooling in Australia: Perspectives from Students, Parents, and Educators

Reid. C. & Watson, C. (2015) Compulsory Schooling in Australia: Perspectives from Students, Parents, and Educators, Palgrave Macmillan

Increasing the school-leaving age is seen to be a panacea to a range of problems related to health, welfare, and the human capital of nations in much of the developed world. This book examines whether or not increasing the years of compulsory schooling can make a difference in the most diverse region of Australia: South-Western Sydney. The authors reveal the desires and disappointments of students and parents and the impact on schools and teachers’ work. Special attention is taken to uncover the link between neoliberal imperatives governing teachers’ work and the opportunities afforded students and families. The authors show how the social relations of ability, gender, ethnicity, race, and class are implicated in response to challenging school contexts. They draw on recent sociological analysis of families becoming market negotiators and reveal the striking policy disjuncture framing the work of teachers and the lives of students and their families.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Qualitative Social Research: Contemporary Methods for the Digital Age

Waller, V., Farquharson, K. &  Dempsey, D. (2015). Qualitative Social Research: Contemporary Methods for the Digital Age, Sage.

Qualitative Social Research employs an accessible approach to present the multiple ways in which criticism enhances research practice. Packed full of relevant, ‘real world’ examples, it showcases the strengths and pitfalls of each research method, integrating the philosophical groundings of qualitative research with thoughtful overviews of a range of commonly used methods.

This book is ideal for students and prospective researchers and explains what makes qualitative sociological research practical, useful and ethical. It’s an essential guide to how to undertake research, use an appropriate research design and work with a range of qualitative data collection methods, and includes:

  • detailed discussions of ethical issues
  • references to new technologies in each chapter
  • explanations of how to integrate online and visual methods with traditional data collection methods
  • exercises to enhance learning

The authors use their many years’ experience in using a range of qualitative methods to conduct and teach research to demonstrate the value of critical thinking skills at all stages of the research process.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Global Inequalities

Holton, r. J. (2015). Global Inequalities, Palgrave

What causes global inequality? Why should we be concerned about it? Is inequality getting worse or are there signs of improvement and progress? This critical analysis of the current state of global inequality pushes beyond ideological prejudice and simplistic explanations, to address these important questions. Offering a distinctive response to the many challenges in the area, the text presents a holistic account of inequality by: • taking a multidisciplinary approach, incorporating perspectives from sociology, politics and economics; • recognising the influence of historical trends on inequality today; • and viewing inequality from a global perspective, as well as a national one. Drawing on major theories of inequality and up-to-date evidence, Robert J. Holton guides readers through the complex issues at hand, making this text a valuable resource for students of sociology, global studies, politics and development studies.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

The Biopolitics of Lifestyle: Foucault, Ethics and Healthy Choices

Mayes, C. (2015). The Biopolitics of Lifestyle: Foucault, Ethics and Healthy Choices, Routledge. 

A growing sense of urgency over obesity at the national and international level has led to a proliferation of medical and non-medical interventions into the daily lives of individuals and populations. This work focuses on the biopolitical use of lifestyle to govern individual choice and secure population health from the threat of obesity. The characterization of obesity as a threat to society caused by the cumulative effect of individual lifestyles has led to the politicization of daily choices, habits and practices as potential threats. This book critically examines these unquestioned assumptions about obesity and lifestyle, and their relation to wider debates surrounding neoliberal governmentality, biopolitical regulation of populations, discipline of bodies, and the possibility of community resistance.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Identity and Belonging

Huppatz, K., Hawkins, M., & Matthews, A. (2015). Identity and Belonging, Palgrave Macmillan.

An accessible introduction to the sociological study of identity and belonging, this wide-ranging and engaging collection examines the interplay between self and society, and draws on case studies to explore sites of identity construction in a globalized world.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Critical Realism for Marxist Sociology of Education

Banfield, G. (2015). Critical Realism for Marxist Sociology of Education, Taylor & Francis

This book offers a critical realist intervention into the field of Marxist Sociology of Education. Critical realism, as developed by British philosopher Roy Bhaskar, is known for its capacity to serve as a conceptual underlabourer to applied fields like education. Indeed, its success in clarifying and resolving thorny issues of educational theory and practice is now well established. Given critical realism’s sympathetic Marxist origins, its productive and critical engagement with Marxism has an even longer history. To date there has been little sustained attention given to the application of critical realism to Marxist educational praxis. The book addresses this gap in existing scholarship.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Research Methods and Global Online Communities: A case study

Maddox, A. (2015). Research Methods and Global Online Communities: A case study, Ashgate

This book brings into focus the technologically augmented nature of global online communities, advancing research methods that reveal the imprint of emergent social forms and characterise digital frontiers of social engagement. Drawing on insights from across the social sciences, it presents a case study of people with passions for reptiles and amphibians to illustrate for next generation researchers how to conduct community research in the real world.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Ecofeminism and Systems Thinking

Stephens, A. (2015). Ecofeminism and Systems Thinking, Routledge

This book brings together two vitally important strands of 20th-century thinking to establish a set of simple and elegant principles for planning, project design and evaluation. It explains the backgrounds of cultural ecofeminism and critical systems thinking, and what we find when they are systematically compared. Both theories share a range of concepts, have a strong social justice ethic, and challenge the legacy of modernity. The book takes theory into practice. The value of the emergent principles of feminist-systems thinking are described and demonstrated through four chapters of case studies in community development settings. The principles can be used to influence project design and outcomes across a range of disciplines including project management, policy, health, education, and community development. This book has much to offer practitioners who seek to create more socially just and equitable project and research outcomes.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Data from the Records of the Coffs Harbour Fire Brigade 1912-1965.

Alan Scott (2015) Data from the Records of the Coffs Harbour Fire Brigade 1912-1965. A deferent approach to data availability. The Coffs Harbour Regional Museum. Read on…

Bourdieu, Habitus and Social Research: The Art of Application

Stahl, G. (2015). Egalitarian Habitus: Narratives in Reconstructions in Discourses of Aspirations and Change, in C. Costa and M. Murphy (Eds.)Bourdieu, Habitus and Social Research: The Art of Application, Palgrave Macmillan

This collection brings together for the first time a set of researchers whose research methodologies centre on Bourdieu’s concept of habitus. Full of insight and innovation, the book is an essential read for anyone wanting to know more about approaches to social theory and its application in research. One of its core objectives is to assist social researchers in their capacity to harness the potential of habitus as a methodological tool, thereby helping to bridge the often troublesome dichotomy between theory and method in the social sciences. It also provides a useful and practical resource on how effectively to apply the concept of habitus to scholarship/research, and can easily be used as a reference book in postgraduate programmes.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Ecofeminism and Systems Thinking

Stephenson, A. (2015) Ecofeminism and Systems Thinking, Routledge.

This book brings together two vitally important strands of 20th-century thinking to establish a set of simple and elegant principles for planning, project design and evaluation. It explains the backgrounds of cultural ecofeminism and critical systems thinking, and what we find when they are systematically compared. Both theories share a range of concepts, have a strong social justice ethic, and challenge the legacy of modernity. The book takes theory into practice. The value of the emergent principles of feminist-systems thinking are described and demonstrated through four chapters of case studies in community development settings. The principles can be used to influence project design and outcomes across a range of disciplines including project management, policy, health, education, and community development. This book has much to offer practitioners who seek to create more socially just and equitable project and research outcomes.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

 

 

Research Methods and Global Online Communities: A Case Study

Maddox, A. (2015)  Research Methods and Global Online Communities: A Case Study, Ashgate

This book brings into focus the technologically augmented nature of global online communities, advancing research methods that reveal the imprint of emergent social forms and characterise digital frontiers of social engagement. Drawing on insights from across the social sciences, it presents a case study of people with passions for reptiles and amphibians to illustrate for next generation researchers how to conduct community research in the real world.

Richly illustrated with ethnographic research, together with extensive survey and interview material drawn from around the world, Research Methods and Global Online Communities explores the changing nature of communities that form around common interests and are embedded in a digital architecture rather than place. In doing so, this book transcends the digital dualism of online/offline models of community and engages with debates on the social impacts of the internet and the adaptive nature of community.

As such, it will appeal to social scientists interested in innovative approaches to characterising digital communities through mixed-methods research practice.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Postfeminist Digital Cultures Femininity, Social Media, and Self-Representation

Dobson, A.S. (2015) Postfeminist Digital Cultures Femininity, Social Media, and Self-Representation, Palgrave Macmillan

Postfeminist Digital Cultures explores some of the more controversial and contested social media practices engaged in by girls and young women, including sexual self-representations on social network sites, sexting, and self-harm vlogs. Informed by feminist media and cultural studies, Dobson delves beyond alarmist accounts to ask what it is we fear about young women’s self-representation in networked publics, and unpacks the complexity of digitally mediating young femininity in the postfeminist era.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Engaging with Social Work: A Critical Introduction

Morley, C., Macfarlane, S. & Ablett, P. (2015) Engaging with Social Work: A Critical Introduction

 

 

This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the diverse and contested world of social work. It explores the key concepts and theoretical frameworks underpinning contemporary social work practice, as well as relevant professional skills and strategies from a critical perspective. In a rapidly changing world, it locates critical social work as a part of broader and ongoing struggles for social justice and human rights. Readers are encouraged to think about what social work is or should be, and what sort of social worker they would like to become. The book covers a broad range of topics, including the history and development of social work as a profession, values and ethics, theories for practice, and the fields and context of practice. Definitions of key terms, reflective exercises and case studies are integrated throughout the text. Written by a diverse team of experienced educators, this is a stimulating, rigorous and student-friendly resource.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Making Sense of School Choice Politics, Policies, and Practice under Conditions of Cultural Diversity

Windle, J.A. (2015) Making Sense of School Choice Politics, Policies, and Practice under Conditions of Cultural Diversity, Palgrave Macmillan

Why is choosing a school an urgent and self-defining task for some, and virtually meaningless for others? How is it possible that most parents contemplate only a single educational option in even the world’s most marketized education system? Making Sense of School Choice provides an original analysis of the global rise of neoliberal education reform, focussing on the curriculum as the site for tensions both in the mass expansion of secondary education, and in attempts to contain these through a return to socially restrictive schooling. The investigation provides fresh insights into the ways families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds understand and engage with school choice, as well as efforts by schools to manage their market position. Windle casts new light on the transnational networks through which political and corporate players, the media, and elite educational institutions dictate terms to socially exposed sites – those schools catering to minority and disadvantaged student populations.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Writing for Research: The E Booklet

Raewyn Connell writes:

Myths and realities

There are two great myths that distort our picture of writing – one old, one new.

The old myth is that writing is simply a matter of genius and inspiration.  Someone blessed with the gift sits down on a fine morning with pen in hand, the ghostly Muse whispers in his or her ear, and a brilliant text springs forth.  No-one understands how.  All we can do is gasp in admiration – and hope that the Muse will whisper in our ear, next time. Read on…

Nouveau-riche Nationalism and Multiculturalism in Korea: A media narrative analysis

Han, Gil-Soo. (2015) Nouveau-riche Nationalism and Multiculturalism in Korea: A media narrative analysis, Routledge

The unprecedented economic success of South Korea since the 1990s has led in turn to a large increase in the number of immigrants and foreign workers in Korean industries. This book describes and explains the experiences of discrimination and racism that foreigners and ‘new’ Koreans have faced in a multicultural South Korea. It looks at how society has treated the foreigners and what their experiences have been given that common discourse about race in Korea surrounds issues of Korean heterogeneity and pure blood nationalism.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Queensland: Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask

Bahnisch, M. (2015) Queensland: Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask, Newsouth Books

Everyone has heard the clichés about Queensland politics: Queensland is ‘different’. It’s the ‘Deep North’. Its state elections exemplify Pineapple Party Time. But what if those clichés are in fact looking more like the state of affairs in the rest of Australia? Does the Sunshine State represent the new normal in Australian politics? Once, Queensland was seen as the land that time forgot, with a narrow economy based on agriculture, mining and transport – and conservative values. Then, from the 1980s, a transformation took place as the state modernised, entrenching democratic reforms and civil liberties. Yet now, in the era of Campbell Newman, the Palmer United Party and national politics that oozes alarmist populism, it feels like Queensland’s history of eccentricity and unrest has colonised the whole country.So how does Queensland both point the way forward and shine a light on the way we live now? Political commentator and Queenslander Mark Bahnisch looks closely and boldly at the Queensland experience, from the Joh Era to the present. His must-read book reaches some surprising conclusions.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Youth Homelessness in Later Modernity: Reflexive Identities and Moral Worth

Farrugia, D. (2015) Youth Homelessness in Later Modernity: Reflexive Identities and Moral Worth, Springer

This book explores the identities, embodied experiences, and personal relationships of young people experiencing homelessness, and analyses these in relation to the material and symbolic position that youth homelessness occupies in modern societies. Drawing on empirical research conducted in both urban and rural areas, the book situates young people’s experiences of homelessness within a theoretical framework that connects embodied identities and relationships with processes of social change. The book theorises a ‘symbolic economy of youth homelessness’ that encompasses the subjective, aesthetic, and relational dimensions of homelessness. This theory shows the personal, interpersonal and affective suffering that is caused by the relations of power and privilege that produce contemporary youth homelessness. The book is unique in the way in which it places youth homelessness within the wider contexts of inequality, and social change. Whilst contemporary discussions of youth homelessness understand the topic as a discrete ‘social problem’, this book demonstrates the position that youth homelessness occupies within wider social processes, inequalities, and theoretical debates, addressing theories of social change in late modernity and their relationship to the cultural construction of youth. These theoretical debates are made concrete by means of an exploration of an important form of contemporary inequality: youth homelessness.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Why Current Affairs Needs Social Theory

Rob Stones (2015) Why Current Affairs Needs Social Theory, Bloomsbury Publishing.

Television news is frequently disparaged by thoughtful commentators ) r its preoccupation with drama and spectacle at the expense of serious, in-depth, engagement with the critical issues it covers. Whilst insisting these charges possess more than a small dose of truth, Rob Stones argues for more emphasis to be placed on strengthening the capacities of audiences. Drawing from major traditions in social thought, and on academic media analysis, Stones provides the conceptual tools for audiences to bring greater sophistication to their interpretations, developing their capacity to think across items and genres.

A detailed account of an episode of the Danish political drama, Borgen, reveals the extent to which its viewers already deploy similar concepts and skills in order to follow its storylines. Stones shows how audiences can refine these skills further and demonstrates their value with respect to a wide range of current affairs texts, including: Israeli settlers on the West Bank; the Rwandan genocide; the Egyptian ‘revolution’; the Obama administration’s immigration reform bill; the bases of Germany’s economic success; the conflict between ‘red shirts’ and ‘yellow shirts’ in Thailand; China’s diplomatic relations with Burma; and scandals of mistreatment within the UK and Swedish healthcare systems.

The book shows that everyone’s understanding of current affairs can be significantly enhanced by social theory. It will be relevant to students of sociology, politics, media studies and journalism at all levels.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.  Rob Stones has also written a short paper on the book, which is accessible here.

 

 

The Search for Meaning in Film and Television: Disenchantment at the Turn of the Millennium

Marcus Maloney (2015) The Search for Meaning in Film and Television:  Disenchantment at the Turn of the Millennium, Palgrave Macmillan

This fascinating study explores the difficulties faced by modern Westerners in their search for a meaningful life. It sheds light on this enduring cultural dilemma through a close reading of four popular film and television narratives: Pixar’s animated feature film, Toy Story; Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins and The Dark Knight; the television romantic comedy, Sex and the City; and, finally, the mobster drama, The Sopranos. The readings are guided by a number of inter-related questions. First, in what ways do these popular stories speak to the modern West’s meaning dilemma? What do they have to say about contemporary culture, and its capacity to illuminate the fundamental human questions? What are the core problems faced by the central characters and how are they resolved? Finally, and perhaps most importantly, do the four stories that come into focus suggest hope or despair in the modern West’s search for meaning?

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Towards a Sociology of Cancer Caregiving: Time to Feel

Rebecca Olson (2015) Towards a Sociology of Cancer Caregiving: Time to Feel, Ashgate Publishing

Once a synonym for death, cancer is now a prognosis of multiple probabilities and produces a world of uncertainty for carers. Drawing on rich, in-depth interview data and employing interactionist theories, Towards a Sociology of Cancer Caregiving explores carers’ lived experiences, paying close attention to the ways in which spouse carers manage the ambiguity that pervades their orientations to the future, their responsibilities and their emotions.

A detailed exploration of the temporal and emotional journeys of spouse carers of cancer patients, this volume raises and responds to new questions about how to conceptualise informal caregiving, offering a fresh theorisation of the uncertainty that now characterises cancer. As such, it will appeal to scholars of the sociologies of emotion, time and identity, and all those interested in the question of how to support informal carers.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Divided Subjects, Invisible Borders Re-Unified Germany After 1989

Ben Gook (2015) Divided Subjects, Invisible Borders: Re-Unified Germany After 1989, Roman and Littlefield International

Divided Subjects, Invisible Borders details, through empirical and theoretical exposition, how the national unity of Germany after the Fall of the Berlin Wall conceals persistent division in the lives of eastern and western Germans.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Religious Identity and Social Change: Explaining Christian Conversion in a Muslim World

David Radford (2015) Religious Identity and Social Change: Explaining Christian Conversion in a Muslim World, Routledge.

Religious Identity and Social Change offers a macro and micro analysis of the dynamics of rapid social and religious change occurring within the Muslim world. Drawing on rich ethnographic and quantitative research in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, David Radford provides rich theoretical insight into the nature of religious and social change and ethnic identity transformation exploring significant questions concerning why people convert and what happens when they do so. A crisis of identity occurs when religious conversion takes place, especially from one major religious tradition (Islam) to another (Christianity); and where religious identity is intimately connected to ethnic and national identity. Radford argues for the importance of recognising the socially constructed nature of identity involving the dynamic interplay between human agency, culture and social networks. Kyrgyz Christians have been active agents in bringing religious and identity transformation building upon the contextual parameters in which they are situated.

More information is available here.

Hearing Impairment and Hearing Disability: Towards a Paradigm Change in Hearing Services

Anthony Hogan & Rebecca Phillips (2015) Hearing Impairment and Hearing Disability: Towards a Paradigm Change in Hearing Services, Ashgate Publishing.

The purpose of this book is to challenge people (service providers, people with a hearing disability and those who advocate for them) to reconsider the way western society thinks about hearing disability and the way it seeks to ‘include them’. It highlights the concern that the design of hearing services is so historically marinated in ableist culture that service users often do not realise they may be participating in their own oppression within a phono-centric society.

With stigma and marginalisation being the two most critical issues impacting on people with hearing disability, Hogan and Phillips document both the collective and personal impacts of such marginality. In so doing, the book brings forward an argument for a paradigm shift in hearing services. Drawing upon the latest research and policy work, the book opens up a conceptual framework for a new approach to hearing services and looks at the kinds of personal and systemic changes a paradigm shift would entail.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Battle for the Flag

Amelia Johns (2015) Battle for the Flag, Melbourne University Press

Ten years after the Cronulla riots, the violence, racism and branding of young bodies with signs and symbols of Australian nationalism, along with the reprisal attacks by Lebanese-Australian youth, continues to inflame discussions about race relations in Australia, with many conversations shifting away from ideas of multiculturalism and cultural diversity, and towards patriotism, localism, security and fear of the (predominantly) Muslim ‘Other’.
Battle for the Flag contextualises and challenges the narrative by drawing upon participant observation and interviews conducted with local residents of diverse backgrounds. By paying attention to the voices of bystanders and those involved, the riot is identified as an unstable and fluid formation, where the Australian flag, the beach and whiteness itself was co-opted into a much more contingent, contested and subcultural formation than hitherto described.

More information is available in the Publisher’s website.

The Martin Presence - Jean Martin and the Making of Social Sciences in Australia

Beilharz, P.,  Hogan, T. & Shaver, S. (2015) The Martin Presence – Jean Martin and the Making of Social Sciences in Australia, UNSW Press

Jean Martin was a pioneer of sociology, inventing a version of the discipline that was uniquely suited to Australia in the post-war period. Jean Isobel Martin (1923u79) made herself a sociologist before the discipline was established in Australia. Regarded as the founding mother of Australian sociology, her writing, teaching and policy helped shape Australia in the period of economic growth and social development that followed World War II. The Martin Presence examines her work across the prevailing concerns of the time u the needs of country towns, the factory work floor, families and urban structure, poverty and inequality, education and immigration u and explores her farreaching influence on the study of social sciences in Australia.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Identity, Neoliberalism and Aspiration: Educating white working-class boys

Garth Stahl (2015) Identity, Neoliberalism and Aspiration: Educating white working-class boys, Routledge

In recent years there has been growing concern over the pervasive disparities in academic achievement that are highly influenced by ethnicity, class and gender. Specifically, within the neoliberal policy rhetoric, there has been concern over underachievement of working-class young males, specifically white working-class boys. The historic persistence of this pattern, and the ominous implication of these trends on the long-term life chances of white working-class boys, has led to a growing chorus that something must be done to intervene.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

What is a Social Relation?: An Apprenticeship in Sociological Imagination

Metcalfe, A. & Game, A. (2015) What is a Social Relation?: An Apprenticeship in Sociological Imagination, Australian Scholarly Publishing

This book explains the fundamental logic of social relationships and offers an apprenticeship in sociological thinking and practice. Rather than telling you what key social theorists have said, the authors collaborate with you to make sense of classic texts. Demonstrating the relational principles involved in social analysis, the authors work alongside you to plan social research, analyse interviews, and develop original ideas. You will practise sociology, rather than just learning about it. No matter what career you pursue, no matter where life takes you, you will live with a deeper appreciation of your relational environment.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

 

Academic Identities in Higher Education: The Changing European Landscape

Seddon, T. (2015). Academic identity formation: Reframing the long shadow of Europe, in J.Nixon and L. Evans (Eds.) Academic Identities in Higher Education: The Changing European Landscape, London, Bloomsbury.

Academic identity is continually being formed and reformed by the institutional, socio-cultural and political contexts within which academic practitioners operate. In Europe the impact of the 2008 economic crisis and its continuing aftermath accounts for many of these changes, but the diverse cultures and histories of different regions are also significant factors, influencing how institutions adapt and resist, and how identities are shaped. Academic Identities in Higher Education highlights the multiple influences acting upon academic practitioners and documents some of the ways in which they are positioning themselves in relation to these often competing pressures.

At a time when higher education is undergoing huge structural and systemic change there is increasing uncertainty regarding the nature of academic identity. Traditional notions compete with new and emergent ones, which are still in the process of formation and articulation. Academic Identities in Higher Education explores this process of formation and articulation and addresses the question: what does it mean to be an academic in 21st century Europe?

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

eGirls, eCitizens

Akane Kanai – Thinking beyond the Internet as a tool: Girls’ online spaces as postfeminist structures of surveillance in Jane Bailey and Valerie Steeves (eds) (2015) eGirls eCitizens University of Ottawa Press

Some Personal Stories of German Immigration to Australia since 1945

Ingrid Muenstermann (2015) Some Personal Stories of German Immigration to Australia since 1945

This book deals with immigration processes of Germans who have arrived in Australia since 1945. It is an attempt to catch the voices of these people, to let them talk about their hopes, aspirations, achievements and disappointments. In 2010 notices were sent out all over Australia, asking ‘Germans’ (most of them Australians today) to write about their experiences, about challenges and positive happenings. The book contains 28 chapters written by German-born women and men from all walks of life, some came to Australia as children, some as adults, others talk about the lives of their immigrant parents, one person pays tribute to a partner he has lost recently, and who describes her impressions about university life in Germany and in Australia, another person looks back at twenty-three years in Australia and the fine line that divides him and the Australian people. Most, but not all, are success stories. This book also includes three chapters about organisations that provided a buffer zone for new arrivals in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s: Club Harmony of Melbourne, the Club of the Danube Swabians in Adelaide, and the SA German Club. The final chapter is an interview with a person who had to flee Nazi Germany in 1938, with Ernie Salomon.

Re-enchanting Nationalisms: Rituals and Remembrances in a Postmodern Age

Brad West (2015)  Re-enchanting Nationalisms:  Rituals and Remembrances in a Postmodern Age, Springer

This book provides original insight into the way we now engage and remember national history. Drawing on fieldwork and analysis of international case studies on state commemoration, memorialization, recreational and tourism and times of disaster and crisis, the author demonstrates that not only does the nation frequently retain a strong cultural relevance in our global world but that the emergence of new forms of ritual and remembrance means that in many instances we are seeing the re-enchantment of nationalism. Drawing upon and developing an empirically informed cultural sociology, the author charts the distinctive qualities of these new national rites and how they feed into and advance particular cosmopolitan and orthodox national politics. Because social science has so often wrongly assumed the end of nationalism, the insights of this of the book about the possibilities and limitations of contemporary nationalism demand serious consideration by academics and also by policy makers and the general public.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Queensland: Everything you wanted to know, but were afraid to ask

Mark Bahnisch – Queensland:  Everything you wanted to know, but were afraid to ask, New South Books

Everyone has heard the clichés about Queensland politics: Queensland is ‘different’. It’s the ‘Deep North’. Its state elections exemplify Pineapple Party Time. But what if those clichés are in fact looking more like the state of affairs in the rest of Australia? Does the Sunshine State represent the new normal in Australian politics?

Once, Queensland was seen as the land that time forgot, with a narrow economy based on agriculture, mining and transport – and conservative values. Then, from the 1980s, a transformation took place as the state modernised, entrenching democratic reforms and civil liberties. Yet now, in the era of Campbell Newman, the Palmer United Party and national politics that oozes alarmist populism, it feels like Queensland’s history of eccentricity and unrest has colonised the whole country.

So how does Queensland both point the way forward and shine a light on the way we live now? Political commentator and Queenslander Mark Bahnisch looks closely and boldly at the Queensland experience, from the Joh Era to the present. His must-read book reaches some surprising conclusions.

“Bahnisch’s deep north is a beautiful hive of scum and villainy one day, a perfect storm of gothic corruption the next” – John Birmingham

For further details, please see the Publisher’s website.

Age-Dissimilar Couples and Romantic Relationships: Ageless Love?

Lara McKenzie (2015) Age-Dissimilar Couples and Romantic Relationships: Ageless Love?, Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Studies in Family and Intimate Life Series

In recent years, there has been widespread fascination with age-dissimilar, heterosexual romantic relationships. This interest is not new – these types of couples have featured in Western media for decades, even centuries – yet qualitative research into such relationships has been limited.

This book examines how the romantic relationships of age-dissimilar couples are understood. Based largely on interviews, McKenzie argues that historical shifts toward greater personal autonomy in partner selection, within relationships, and in relationship dissolution have been greatly overstated. Through her focus on age-dissimilar couples, whose increasing prevalence has often been seen to be part of this shift, she suggests that these relationships are an avenue through which shared cultural understandings of relatedness, as well as autonomy, might be further analysed. McKenzie argues for an approach that emphasises cultural continuity, and which accounts for complexity and contradiction in how age-dissimilar relationships and romantic love are understood.

Examining key issues of kinship, age, and emotion, Age-Dissimilar Couples and Romantic Relationships will appeal to scholars of Cultural and Social Anthropology, Family Studies, and Sociology.

Lara McKenzie is a Research Associate at the University of Western Australia, Australia. Her research interests include age-dissimilar relationships, romantic love, age, gender, Australian society, neoliberalism, higher education, blended learning, and government/non-government school inequalities.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Interrogating Conceptions of "Vulnerable Youth" in Theory, Policy and Practice

Kitty te Riele &  Radhika Gorur (Eds.) (2015) Interrogating Conceptions of “Vulnerable Youth” in Theory, Policy and Practice, Sense Publishers.

Young people who are considered ‘vulnerable’ or ‘at risk’ are a particular target of various policies, schemes and interventions. But what does vulnerability mean? Interrogating Conceptions of “Vulnerable Youth” explores this question in relation to various policy fields that are relevant to young people, as well for how this plays out in practice and how it is experienced by young people themselves.

What makes this book unique is that most authors had the opportunity to jointly explore these issues during a two-day workshop, and their chapters are informed by their cross-agency and cross-discipline discussions, making for a nuanced and thoughtful set of contributions. This collection is highly recommended for researchers and research students in the social sciences, as well as professional staff working in youth policy and youth services, in government departments and in NGOs.

“Those who are most vulnerable should receive our greatest moral attention. However, the translation of generalised moral principles into effective policy and programs has never been easy. Political interests have invariably intervened, leading to complex debates about how vulnerability should be defined, classified, measured and represented. In recent years, these debates have become further complicated, as nation-states around the world have preached austerity.

This timely book suggests that the responsibility for protecting the vulnerable cannot be left to individuals, but demands collective action, through institutions such as education, health and welfare. It examines some of the ways in which public policies and programs represent those who are vulnerable, involving a range of assumptions about the social, economic and political conditions that produce their vulnerabilities.” From the Foreword by Professor Fazal Rizvi

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Hope in Health: The Socio-Politics of Optimism

Alan Petersen (2015) Hope in Health: The Socio-Politics of Optimism, Palgrave

The language of hope permeates contemporary health and healthcare. It is believed that patients who are hopeful are more likely to recover, and health professionals endeavour to ‘instil’ or ‘manage’ hope in patients. The rhetoric of hope is extensively employed in marketing medical tests, treatments and devices. Despite this focus on hope in health, sociologists and other social scientists have failed to offer a systematic analysis of the discourses of hope and related practices.

This book is the first to explore the socio-politics of hope in the contexts of health and healthcare. It highlights the significance of technological promise in contemporary conceptions of hope, making reference to examples such as stem cell treatments, medical testing, personal risk management, the use of self-tracking devices, and anti-ageing treatments and longevity research. The book concludes by arguing for scholars to take more seriously the significance of ‘hope’ in the contexts of health and healthcare.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Engaging Men in Building Gender Equality

Flood, M., with R. Howson (eds.) (2015). Engaging Men in Building Gender Equality. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press.

Men’s roles in building gender equality are currently on the public agenda. Across the globe, there are growing efforts to engage men and boys in building more equitable relations with women and girls. Programs that engage with men have proliferated in fields such as violence prevention, sexual and reproductive health, parenting, education, and work. The last decade has seen the emergence of national and global campaigns, initiatives by international agencies, and scholarly research. Engaging Men in Building Gender Equality brings together the key discussions and evaluations of this field.

Engaging Men in Building Gender Equality contributes to the positive impact of efforts to engage men in progress towards gender equality. Some chapters’ contributions are practical, exploring the promise and problems of this work. These chapters are authored by educators, activists, and researchers, and highlight valuable or innovative programs and initiatives and the lessons learned from these. Other chapters’ contributions are more conceptual and political, inviting more thoughtful and critical understandings of men, masculinities, and the question of men’s involvements in feminism. In these contributions, leading writers in the field explore how to understand men and masculinities – how to make sense of the meanings given to manhood, the lives men lead, and the changing patterns of men’s and women’s relations.

The book has a global reach. Some chapters offer frameworks and insights applicable to work regarding men and gender across the globe, while other chapters present case studies from particular countries or regions. Engaging Men in Building Gender Equality bridges the gap between contemporary scholarship on men and gender, on the one hand, and practical work with men on the other. The book will be of interest to a wide range of researchers, advocates, educators, and professionals from universities, governments, local and international organisations, and community agencies. It offers a timely examination of an area of policy, programming, and research which is growing rapidly.

More information is available Publisher’s website.

Perspectives on Marital Dissolution: Divorce Biographies in Singapore

Quah, Sharon Ee Ling (2015) Perspectives on Marital Dissolution  Divorce Biographies in Singapore, Springer.

This book presents a sociological account on marital dissolution that engages and extends theorisations on individualisation and the contemporary organisation of personal relationships to discuss how the experience of divorce might not be all debilitating but on the contrary, could provide opportunities for productivity, self-responsibility and relationship formation. Using Singaporean divorcees’ narrative accounts, the book explores how divorcees shape and construct what the author refers to as, a divorce biography, to end their unsatisfying marriages, cope with the crisis, negotiate the associated risks, organise post-divorce personal communities and make future plans. It uncovers how divorcees navigate their divorce biographies within the economic, policy and social context they are located in and examines the conditions that facilitate or hinder the pursuit of productivity in different facets of their post-divorce lives. Far from a standard story of divorce, this book presents the diversity and complexity of Singaporean divorce biographies. The research challenges negative discourses associated with divorce and offers a more nuanced perspective by discussing both the precarious and productive aspects of the experience. More importantly, it provides a critical discussion on the limited definition of family prevalent in Singaporean society, and shows how post-divorce family life and practices continue to thrive despite the rupture of marriage.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Religious Identity and Social Change Explaining Christian conversion in a Muslim world

David Radford (2015) Religious Identity and Social Change Explaining Christian conversion in a Muslim world, Routledge.

Religious Identity and Social Change offers a macro and micro analysis of the dynamics of rapid social and religious change occurring within the Muslim world. Drawing on rich ethnographic and quantitative research in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, David Radford provides rich theoretical insight into the nature of religious and social change and ethnic identity transformation exploring significant questions concerning why people convert and what happens when they do so. A crisis of identity occurs when religious conversion takes place, especially from one major religious tradition (Islam) to another (Christianity); and where religious identity is intimately connected to ethnic and national identity. Radford argues for the importance of recognising the socially constructed nature of identity involving the dynamic interplay between human agency, culture and social networks. Kyrgyz Christians have been active agents in bringing religious and identity transformation building upon the contextual parameters in which they are situated.

Further information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Social Transformation and Migration: National and Local Experiences in South Korea, Turkey, Mexico and Australia

Edited by Stephen Castles, Derya Ozkul, Magdalena Cubas (2015)  Social Transformation and Migration: National and Local Experiences in South Korea, Turkey, Mexico and Australia. Palgrave.

This book examines theories and specific experiences of international migration and social transformation, with special reference to the effects of neo-liberal globalization on four societies with vastly different historical and cultural characteristics: South Korea, Australia, Turkey and Mexico. All of these countries have undergone far-reaching changes linked to incorporation of their economics into global value chains over the last decades. At the same time they have experienced new forms of immigration and emigration, which are closely related to the interaction between global forces and national and local forms of adaptation and resistance. Social Transformation and Migration conceptualizes migration not as the result of change nor a cause of change, but as an integral component of these transformation processes.

Full details are available on the Publisher’s website.

Disability and the Media

Katie Ellis, Gerard Goggin (2015) Disability and the Media, Palgrave.

Media is a significant part of contemporary society and culture, and is subsequently crucial to our understanding of disability. How exactly does the media interact with disability and vice versa? Does the media adequately reflect the lives of people with disabilities or offer a means of social inclusion? Does the media perpetuate stigma or deny access to those with disabilities?

This concise, integrated introduction to the complex relationship between disability and the media offers a road map to the key areas of participation, access and representation. Bringing together international theoretical work and research on disability, with analysis and examples across a diverse range of media forms – from radio, to news, popular television and new digital technologies – the text explores the potential for establishing a more diverse, rich and just media. It is an invaluable resource for students of Media and Communication Studies, Cultural Studies and Disability Studies.

Full details are available from the Publisher’s website.

Radical Environmentalism Nature, Identity and More-than-human Agency

John Cianchi (2015) Radical Environmentalism  Nature, Identity and More-than-human Agency, Palgrave.

Environmentalism is a contest about the meaning of nature and the social construction of activism, deviance and harm. The contests that are the subject of this book are fought on the margins, in spaces where what is deviant and what is criminal are fluid concepts. Forest activists engaged in Tasmania’s old-growth forests, and Sea Shepherd Conservation Society activists campaigning in the Southern Ocean to protect whales tell powerful and moving stories about their encounters with nature. These are profound experiences that fundamentally alter how they understand themselves and their world. What emerges in this book is a perspective that recognises the personhood of non-humans and which gives rise to a strong moral obligation to defend nature from harm.

Providing a unique account of environmentalism, one that highlights the voices of the activists and the nature they defend, Radical Environmentalism: Nature, Identity and More-than-human Agencywill be of great interest to students and academics of green criminology, environmental sociology and nature–human studies more broadly.

 

Further information is available on the Publisher’s website.

The War on Drugs in Sport: Moral Panics and Organizational Legitimacy

Vanessa McDermott (2015) The War on Drugs in Sport: Moral Panics and Organizational Legitimacy, Routledge

This innovative and compelling work critically examines the relationship between sport, moral regulation and governance from a moral panic theoretical perspective. It argues that doping scandals create a crisis for sport governing bodies and other elite groups, leading to a moral panic, where the issues at stake for them are perceptions of their organizational legitimacy. McDermott also highlights the role of the media as a site where claims to legitimacy are made and contested, contributing to the social construction of a moral panic. The book makes a key contribution to moral panic theory by adapting Goode and Ben-Yehuda’s moral panic model to capture the diversity of interests and complex relationships between elite groups. It will be important reading for all students, researchers and policy-makers interested in sport sociology, moral panic theory, policy work on about governance and regulation, and the relationship between sport and wider society.

Further details are available on the Publisher’s website.

The Palgrave Handbook of Social Theory in Health, Illness and Medicine

Fran Collyer (2015) The Palgrave Handbook of Social Theory in Health, Illness and Medicine, Palgrave

This wide-reaching handbook offers a new perspective on the sociology of health, illness and medicine by stressing the importance of social theory, and giving due attention to theorists often overlooked in the healthcare field including Harriet Martineau and Raewyn Connell, as well as more widely known theorists such as Michel Foucault and Max Weber.

Here for the first time is a compendium of both male and female social theorists from the turn of the 19th century to the present day. Within these chapters, leading international sociologists from Europe, America, Britain, Australia, New Zealand and Canada investigate the key concepts and theories of a single theorist, looking at the way their ideas such as medicalisation, reflexivity, capitalism, hegemonic masculinity, the biomedical model and social stigma can be used to understand specific health issues including men’s health, Indigenous health, disability, the health professions and chronic illness.

Providing a systematic and comprehensive overview of social theory’s contribution to our understanding of health, illness and medicine, this handbook will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students in the fields of Health, Medical Sociology and Social Theory.

Further details are available on the Publisher’s website.

Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport

Kathryn Henne (2015) Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport, Rutgers University Press

Incidents of doping in sports are common in news headlines, despite regulatory efforts. How did doping become a crisis? What does a doping violation actually entail? Who gets punished for breaking the rules of fair play? In Testing for Athlete Citizenship, Kathryn E. Henne, a former competitive athlete and an expert in the law and science of anti-doping regulations, examines the development of rules aimed at controlling performance enhancement in international sports.
As international and celebrated figures, athletes are powerful symbols, yet few spectators realize that a global regulatory network is in place in an attempt to ensure ideals of fair play. The athletes caught and punished for doping are not always the ones using performance-enhancing drugs to cheat. In the case of female athletes, violations of fair play can stem from their inherent biological traits. Combining historical and ethnographic approaches, Testing for Athlete Citizenship offers a compelling account of the origins and expansion of anti-doping regulation and gender-verification rules.
Drawing on research conducted in Australasia, Europe, and North America, Henne provides a detailed account of how race, gender, class, and postcolonial formations of power shape these ideas and regulatory practices. Testing for Athlete Citizenship makes a convincing case to rethink the power of regulation in sports and how it separates athletes as a distinct class of citizens subject to a unique set of rules because of their physical attributes and abilities.

Further details are available on the Publisher’s website.

Young Citizens and Political Participation in a Digital Society

Philippa Collin (2015) Young Citizens and Political Participation in a Digital Society, Palgrave.

We are living in an era of democratic disconnect. A gap exists between institutional understandings and expectations of young citizens and the nature and substance of youthful forms of political action. In recent times youth participation policies have become a popular strategy to address a range of perceived ‘issues’ related to young people: either problems of youth disengagement from democracy or their exclusion from democratic processes.Drawing on the accounts of young people in Australia and the United Kingdom, this book examines questions of youth citizenship and participation by exploring their meanings in policy, practice and youth experience. With reference to recent theoretical work from the New Sociology of Youth, Political Sociology and Media and Communications it examines young people’s perspectives on participation in non-government and youth-led organisations. In doing so, it focuses on what young people think and do – and what can be done to bridge the democratic disconnect.

Full details are available on the Publisher’s website.

Socio-economic conditions and school performance of tutored students in Ouagadougou: a study of the relation between the “tutorial” family and school results

International Students and Crime

Forbes-Mewett, H., McCulloch, J. and Nyland, C. (2015) International Students and Crime. Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills.

International students and crime is of major international concern, impacting on lucrative international student markets, international relations, host countries’ reputations as tolerant and safe, and on the security of students and the public. While crimes against and by international students have attracted a deal of media attention and discussion internationally, there is little research that systematically describes, analyses and reflects on the phenomena.

International Students and Crime analyses a spectrum of crime from petty theft to kidnapping and murder, presenting vital knowledge about international students as victims and perpetrators of crime in the US, the UK and Australia. It highlights the largely hidden phenomena of crimes against female international students and strategies students use to stay safe. Examining the different approaches to student safety in host countries, the book considers the ways in which governments, higher education providers and police approach and implement their responsibilities for international student safety.

Further information is available on the Publisher’s website.

A Sociological Approach to Health Determinants

Toni Schofield (2015) A Sociological Approach to Health Determinants, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne.

A Sociological Approach to Health Determinants investigates how the social works in determining health and health inequity. Taking a global perspective, the book shines a light on how experiences of health, illness and health care are shaped by a variety of complex social dynamics. Informed primarily by sociology, the book engages with the WHO’s social determinants of health approach and draws on contributions from history, political economy and policy analysis to examine issues such as class, gender, ethnicity and indigeneity, and the impact they have on health. A Sociological Approach to Health Determinants is a comprehensive resource that provides a new perspective on the influence of social structures on health, and how our understanding of the social can ensure improved health outcomes for people all over the globe. Toni Schofield is Associate Professor at the University of Sydney. She specialises in research and teaching in sociology, and public policy and administration.

Further information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Minority Policy: Rethinking governance when parliament matters

Brenton Prosser and Richard Denniss (2015) Minority Policy: rethinking governance when parliament matters, Melbourne University Press.

Topical and up to the minute, Minority Policy: Rethinking governance when parliament matters explores the influence of marginal parliamentarians both within the major parties and on the cross benches in the formations of contemporary public policy.

Despite Australia having minority government in some form for almost three decades, in theoretical and popular terms it seems that this nation has not yet come to terms with minority as the new norm. Further, prominent policy cycle theory overlooks the subtle but significant influence of marginal parliamentarians on public policy. This book argues that these influences not only have important implications for the outcomes of public policy, but also the work of policy scholars, departmental policy makers and policy advocates.

Drawing on the experiences of two former policy advisers who have worked at the coalface of policy-making, as well as on examples from the last two parliaments, Minority Policy takes the discussion up to and beyond the introduction of the new Senate in July 2014 to take in the significant impact of this much more complex Upper House.

Further information is available on the Publisher’s website. To receive a 30% discount on the purchase of this book, please access the discount code via the book flyer.

The Sociology of Shari’a: Case Studies from around the World

Possamai, Adam, Richardson, James T, Turner, Bryan S. (Eds.) The Sociology of Shari’a: Case Studies from around the World. Springer.

This edited volume offers a collection of papers that presents a comparative analysis of the development of Shari’a in countries with Muslim minorities, such as America, Australia, China, Germany,  Italy, Singapore, South Africa and the Philippines, as well as countries with Muslim majorities, such as Malaysia, Bangladesh, Turkey, and Tunisia.

The Sociology of Shari’a provides a global analysis of these important legal transformations and  examines the topic from a sociological perspective.

Further information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Men Who Sell Sex

Scott, J., Minichiello, V. and Meenagh, J. (2015) Male escorts in Australia. In Aggleton, P. and R. Parker (eds.) Men who sell sex: Global perspectives. Routledge, London.

All over the world, men as well as women exchange sex for money and other forms of reward, sometimes with other men and sometimes with women. In contrast to female prostitution, however, relatively little is known about male sex work, leaving questions unanswered about the individuals involved: their identities and self-understandings, the practices concerned, and the contexts in which they take place.

This book updates the ground-breaking 1998 volume of the same name with an entirely new selection of chapters exploring health, social, political, economic and human rights issues in relation to men who sell sex. Looking at Europe, North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and the Asia-Pacific, each chapter explores questions such as:

  • What is known about the different ways in which men exchange sex for money or other forms of reward?
  • What are the major contexts in which sexual exchange takes place?
  • What meanings do such practices carry for the different partners involved?
  • What are the health and other implications of contemporary forms of male sex work?

Men Who Sell Sex seeks to push the boundaries both of current personal and social understandings and the practices to which these give rise. It is an important reference work for academics and researchers interested in sex work and men’s health including those working in public health, sociology, social work, anthropology, human geography and development studies.

Further information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Key Concepts in Crime and Society

Coomber, Donnermeyer, J., K. McElrath and R., Scott, J., (2014) Crime and Society. London, Sage.

 

“A crucial text for whetting the academic appetite of those studying criminology at university. The comprehensive engagement with key crime and deviance debates and issues make this a perfect springboard for launching into the complex, diverse and exciting realm of researching criminology.”
– Dr Ruth Penfold-Mounce, University of York

“Essential reading for those new to the discipline and an invaluable reference point for those well versed in criminology and the sociology of crime and deviance.”
– Dr Mark Monaghan, University of Leeds

Key Concepts in Crime and Society offers an authoritative introduction to key issues in the area of crime as it connects to society. By providing critical insight into the key issues within each concept as well as highlighted cross-references to other key concepts, students will be helped to grasp a clear understanding of each of the topics covered and how they relate to broader areas of crime and criminality. The book is divided into three parts:

  • Understanding Crime and Criminality: introduces topics such as the social construction of crime and deviance, social control, the fear of crime, poverty and exclusion, white collar crime, victims of crime, race/gender and crime.
  • Types of Crime and Criminality: explores examples including human trafficking, sex work, drug crime, environmental crime, cyber crime, war crime, terrorism, and interpersonal violence.
  • Responses to Crime: looks at areas such as crime and the media, policing, moral panics, deterrence, prisons and rehabilitation.

The book provides an up-to-date, critical understanding on a wide range of crime related topics covering the major concepts students are likely to encounter within the fields of sociology, criminology and across the social sciences.

Further information is available on the Publisher’s website.

A Practical Introduction to In-Depth Interviewing

Alan Morris (2015) A Practical Introduction to In-Depth Interviewing, Sage.

Are you new to qualitative research or a bit rusty and in need of some inspiration? Are you doing a research project involving in-depth interviews? Are you nervous about carrying out your interviews?

This book will help you complete your qualitative research project by providing a nuts and bolts introduction to interviewing. With coverage of ethics, preparation strategies and advice for handling the unexpected in the field, this handy guide will help you get to grips with the basics of interviewing before embarking on your research. While recognising that your research question and the context of your research will drive your approach to interviewing, this book provides practical advice often skipped in traditional methods textbooks.

Written with the needs of social science students and those new to qualitative research in mind, the book will help you plan, prepare for, carry out and analyse your interviews.

More information available on the Publisher’s website

Afghanistan: The Next Phase

Shahid Javed Burki, Iftekhar Ahmad Chwodhury and Riaz Hassan (2014) Afghanistan: The Next Phase, Melbourne University Press

Afghanistan: The Next Phase takes an in-depth look at the present situation in Afghanistan by placing it in the context of the country’s tribal culture, history and demography. It considers its association with Pakistan, with whom it shares not only a long border, but also the Pashtuns, the largest ethnic component in its population and the rise of extremism in many parts of the Sunni world. The country faces an uncertain future as it has yet to develop the institutional structure that could transform it into an inclusive society.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Migrant Capital: Networks, Identities and Strategies

Roger Putulny. (2015).  A Spectrum of Integration: Examining Combinations of Bonding and Bridging Social Capital and Network Heterogeneity amongst Australian Refugee and Skilled Migrants. In: L, Ryan, U. Erel, & A.D’Angelo. Migrant Capital – Networks, Identities and Strategies. Palgrave.

Migrant Capital presents state-of-the-art empirical, theoretical and methodological perspectives on migration, networks, social and cultural capital, exploring the ways in which these bodies of literature can inform and strengthen each other. In so doing, it brings the theoretical and methodological dimensions into dialogue with each other. The migrants discussed in the book are ethnically and socio-economically diverse and have a range of migratory trajectories and experiences. Various types of networks are looked at and compared: intra-ethnic and inter-ethnic; locally-based, national and transnational; informal and formal, including migrant community organisations. Migrant Capital is international in focus drawing on research from Australia, North America, the Caribbean and across Europe. Migration research often focuses on individual cases, thereby running the risk of over-emphasising the peculiarities of particular migrant groups and locations, leading to criticisms of empirical nationalism. The range of case studies in this collection can open up a comparative perspective in order to contribute to a broader theoretical framework rooted in empirical research.

Further information is available on the Publisher’s website.

Informal Labour In Urban India: Three Cities, Three Journeys

Barnes, T, (2015) Informal Labour In Urban India: Three Cities, Three Journeys, Routledge.

During the last two decades, rapid economic growth and development in India has been based upon the mass employment of informal labour. Using case studies from three urban regions, this book examines this growth in modern India’s cities and towns. It argues that India has undergone a process of uneven and combined development during its integration with the world economy, leading to a distorted form of urban development.

This book is about work and resistance in India’s massive ‘informal economy’. It looks at the growth of informal labour in Bangalore, Mumbai and New Delhi during an era of neoliberal economic policymaking. Going beyond mainstream accounts, it argues that India’s rapid economic development has been based upon the mass employment of workers on low wages who lack basic social protection and rights at work. It discusses how urban development in India is characterised by a combination of industrialisation, industrial relocation, restructuring and informalisation. Departing from some existing studies of de-industrialisation, it re-frames informalisation as a process that complements, rather than contradicts, contemporary industrialisation in rapidly-emerging economies. The book adopts a ‘classes of labour’ approach, classifying each case of informal labour as a specific ‘form of exploitation’: as a different way for employers to lower production costs, control workers and increase enterprise flexibility.

Offering a critique of existing data on the measurement and monitoring of informal labour and employment, the book is relevant to students and scholars of Development Studies, International Political Economy and South Asian Studies.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website

 

 

 

Youth Cultures and Subcultures: Australian Perspectives

Baker, S., Robards, B., & Buttigieg, B. (eds) (2015) Youth Cultures & Subcultures: Australian Perspectives, Ashgate: London.

This volume critically examines ‘subculture’ in a variety of Australian contexts, exploring the ways in which the terrain of youth cultures and subcultures has changed over the past two decades and considering whether ‘subculture’ still works as a viable conceptual framework for studying youth culture.

Richly illustrated with concrete case studies, the book is thematically organised into four sections addressing i) theoretical concerns and global debates over the continued usefulness of subculture as a concept; ii) the important place of ‘belonging’ in subcultural experience and the ways in which belonging is played out across an array of youth cultures; iii) the gendered experiences of young men and women and their ways of navigating subcultural participation; and iv) the ethical and methodological considerations that arise in relation to researching and teaching youth culture and subculture.

More information is available from the Publisher’s website.

Rethinking Youth Wellbeing: Critical Perspectives

Katie Wright & Julie McLeod, eds. (2015) Rethinking Youth Wellbeing: Critical Perspectives.Springer.

This volume offers a critical rethinking of the construct of youth wellbeing, stepping back from taken-for-granted and psychologically inflected understandings. Wellbeing has become a catchphrase in educational, health and social care policies internationally, informing a range of school programs and social interventions and increasingly shaping everyday understandings of young people. Drawing on research by established and emerging scholars in Australia, Singapore and the UK, the book critically examines the myriad effects of dominant discourses of wellbeing on the one hand, and the social and cultural dimensions of wellbeing on the other. From diverse methodological and theoretical perspectives, it explores how notions of wellbeing have been mobilized across time and space, in and out of school contexts, and the different inflections and effects of wellbeing discourses are having in education, transnationally and comparatively. The book offers researchers as well as practitioners new perspectives on current approaches to student wellbeing in schools and novel ways of thinking about the wellbeing of young people beyond educational settings. Read on…

Public Sociology: An introduction to Australian society

John Germov & Marilyn Poole (2015)  Public Sociology: An introduction to Australian society, Allen & Unwin.

Public Sociology focuses on the utility and relevance of a sociological perspective to every aspect of social life. The aim is to encourage in students the ability to critically reflect upon the forces – both local and global – shaping their own lives and the communities in which they live. Read on…

 

The Promise of the New and Genealogies of Educational Reform

Julie McLeod and Katie Wright. eds. (2015). The Promise of the New and Genealogies of Educational Reform. London: Routledge.

This volume explores questions about hope, optimism and the possibilities of the ‘new’ as expressed in educational thinking on the nature and problem of adolescence. One focus is on the interwar years in Australian education, and the proliferation of educational reports and programs directed to understanding, governing, educating and enlivening adolescents. This included studies of the secondary school curriculum, reviews of teaching of civics and democracy, the development of guidance programs, the specification of the needs and attributes of the adolescent, and interventions to engage the ‘average student’ in post-primary schooling. Read on…

Social Practices, Intervention and Sustainability: Beyond behaviour change

Yolande Strengers and Cecily Maller. eds. (2015). Social Practices, Intervention and Sustainability: Beyond behaviour change. Routledge

In an era of dramatic environmental change, social change is desperately needed to curb burgeoning consumption. Many calls to action have focused on individual behaviour or technological innovation, with relative silence from the social sciences on other modes and methods of intervening in social life. This book shows how we can go beyond behaviour change in the pursuit of sustainability. Read on…

Youth and Generation: Rethinking change and inequality in the lives of young people

Dan Woodman and Johanna Wyn (2014) Youth and Generation: Rethinking change and inequality in the lives of young people, Sage Publications.

The promise of youth studies is not in simply showing that class, gender and race continue to influence life chances, but to show how they shape young lives today. Dan Woodman and Johanna Wyn argue that understanding new forms of inequality in a context of increasing social change is a central challenge for youth researchers.

More information is available on the Publisher’s website. A review of the book can be accessed here.

Youth and Generation sets an agenda for youth studies building on the concepts of ‘social generation’ and ‘individualisation’ to suggest a framework for thinking about change and inequality in young lives in the emerging Asian Century.